School, Instructor and Student Tables

Sample School Data Table. Columns defined below. After the first few weeks of school, data would be present for every column.
Sample Instructor Data Table. Columns defined below. The columns in the school and instructor data tables are the same. In one the data is rolled up by school and in the other by instructor. Sample School Data Table. Columns defined below. After the first few weeks of school, data would be present for every column.
Sample student data table. Sample School Data Table. Columns defined below. After the first few weeks of school, data would be present for every column.

School and Instructor Tables

The School and Instructor Data tables show you the following data rolled up by School or Instructor.
School and Instructor Tables
Student Table
  • School Name
  • Licenses
    • The number of licenses purchased for that school
  • Number of Students
    • The number of students at the school receiving Once instruction.
  • Average EOYP (End-of-Year Prediction)
    • This is our prediction of what cycle students will end the year at on average. It is based on their current progress and their current pace. Students who have made it through Cycle 84 have covered all kindergarten reading skills and will be fully prepared for 1st grade reading content. Remaining on track for EOYP requires maintaining quality Session Rates, ORF scores, and attendance at coaching meetings.
  • 30 SER w/ no student absences
    • The percent of instructional sessions over the prior 30 days that actually occurred, excluding sessions on days when students were absent. This metric is helpful for understanding whether recent session execution would be significantly higher if student attendance at school improved.
  • SER w/ no student absences
    • The percent of instructional sessions during the given academic year (or filtered date range) that actually occurred, excluding sessions on days when students were absent. This metric is helpful for understanding whether recent session execution would be significantly higher if student attendance at school improved.
  • 30 SER w/ no student and instructor absences
    • The percent of instructional sessions over the prior 30 days that actually occurred, excluding sessions on days when the student or the instructor was absent. This metric is helpful for understanding whether recent session execution would be significantly higher if student and instructor attendance at school improved.
  • SER w/ no student and instructor absences
    • The percent of instructional sessions during the given academic year (or filtered date range) that actually occurred, excluding sessions on days when the student or the instructor was absent. This metric is helpful for understanding whether recent session execution would be significantly higher if student and instructor attendance at school improved.
  • 30 Day Session Execution
    • The percent of scheduled sessions that were held over the preceding 30 days. Comparing this metric to session execution shows whether the recent trend is improving or declining.
  • Session Execution
    • The percent of scheduled sessions that were held. This shows how many days of instruction happen out of the total possible days. Student progress is maximized through repetition and daily practice.
  • Coaching Meetings
    • The percent of coaching meetings that instructors attended. These 30-minute, weekly coaching meetings prepare instructors to deliver instruction as effectively as possible, and instructors’ consistent attendance at these meetings is vital to the success of the program.
  • Cycles / Session
    • The number of “Cycles” (lessons) a student covers per lesson on average.
  • ORF
    • Oral Reading Fluency: this is the percent of words that students read correctly from unfamiliar passages. From the time that students reach Cycle 15, they routinely read new passages in Story Reading tasks independently. We measure and track the percent of words read correctly to assess student progress and support instructors with identifying trends, praise points, and potential pacing adjustments.
  • Average Minutes
    • The average duration of instructional sessions (in minutes). Sessions lasting 13 or more minutes on average allows for an effective amount of student practice each day. This average falling below 13 minutes can lead to a decrease in students’ EOYP.
  • Start
    • The student’s first date on Once
  • Current
    • The student’s current cycle (lesson)
  • EOYP
    • This is our prediction of what cycle students will end the year at on average. It is based on their current progress and their current pace. Students who have made it through Cycle 84 have covered all kindergarten reading skills and will be fully prepared for 1st grade reading content. Remaining on track for EOYP requires maintaining quality Session Rates, ORF scores, and attendance at coaching meetings.
  • 30 Day Session Execution
    • The percent of scheduled sessions that were held over the preceding 30 days. Comparing this metric to session execution shows whether the recent trend is improving
  • Session Execution
    • The percent of scheduled sessions that were held. This shows how many days of instruction happen out of the total possible days. Student progress is maximized through repetition and daily practice.
  • Cyc/Ses
    • Cycles per session: The number of “Cycles” (lessons) a student covers per lesson on average.
  • ORF
    • Oral Reading Fluency: this is the percent of words that students read correctly from unfamiliar passages. From the time that students reach Cycle 15, they routinely read new passages in Story Reading tasks independently. We measure and track the percent of words read correctly to assess student progress and support instructors with identifying trends, praise points, and potential pacing adjustments.
  • Average Minutes
    • The average duration of instructional sessions (in minutes). Sessions lasting 13 or more minutes on average allows for an effective amount of student practice each day. This average falling below 13 minutes can lead to a decrease in students’ EOYP.
  • Session Remaining
    • The number of scheduled sessions remaining inthe year
  • Sessions
    • The number of sessions that have occurred